The Details


G4 “Super Shoe” Bottom

Hyde Drift Boats G4 “super shoe” is the strongest bottom protection available for drift boats. See our videos below showing a G4 bottom being put to the test!

Modular Design

Hyde Drift Boats Pro Models are built on a raised aluminum floor and designed to allowed boat accessories to be changed in and out with ease. Please see the video below for an illustration.

Storage boxes can be added to make your trip more organized, or you can add a pedestal seat to give yourself plenty of standing room. The options are endless! Call a representative at Hyde Drift Boats for more details about this revolutionary design (800) 444-HYDE(4933) or email us.

Fluid Dynamics

Ask any scientist about fluid dynamics and if they are honest with you, they’ll admit to you the complexity of the subject. This is chiefly because mathmatically calculating turbulance is very complex. There are two types of flow in fluid dynamics that we must understand to see how the concept pertains to drift boat hull design. These are laminar flow and turbulent flow.

Turn on a water faucet slowly and watch as the water leaves the tap. As it first leaves the tap it is smooth and undisturbed. The flow at that point is laminar and drag is minimal. Laminar flow is very fragile and can change quickly. Turn the tap on more and watch as the water as it speeds up. The water is disturbed by air and surface texture and becomes less smooth rippled with eddies, swirling, and random motions. At that point the water is in a turbulent flow. Laminar flow conditions are what you look for in hull design because drag is considerably less than with turbulent flow.

Turbulent Flow

Turn on a water faucet fully and watch as the water as it speeds up. The water is disturbed by air and surface texture and becomes less smooth rippled with eddies, swirling, and random motions. At that point the water is in a turbulent flow.

Turbulant Flow That is not to say that turbulence is all bad and should always be eliminated. Take for example the dimples on a golf ball, while traveling at high speeds and rotating there is more pressure on the front of the ball than on the rear. The dimples create a turbulent boundary layer that brings the high speed air stream around the ball closer to the surface. This in turn increases the pressure behind the ball propelling it forward further.

So why not put dimples on boat hulls, airplanes and anything else that has performance reduction because of drag? Dimples wouldn’t work on boat hulls because they are flat, slow, and don’t rotate. Dimples on a boat hull could create more drag.

We won’t get into airplanes, and other things as boat hulls are our main focus but the same principles apply. It is the shape, speed, and rotation of the ball (in addition to the dimples) that allows turbulence to work on golf balls.

Laminar Flow

Turn on a water faucet slowly and watch as the water leaves the tap. As it first leaves the tap it is smooth and undisturbed. The flow at that point is laminar and drag is minimal. Laminar flow is very fragile and can change quickly.

Chines

We use sharp angled chines on our boats which allow you to control the boat much like sharp edges on a ski would. Sharp chines on your drift boat are like having low profile Z rated tires on your car. They are a must to
control your craft well.